Bespoke Shirts – What You Ought to Know About the Well Fitted Dress Shirt | Fitness

For many shirt enthusiasts and shirt makers the fitted bespoke dress shirt means as much to the design of the shirt as the actually materials of the dress shirt. If you take a closer look you will notice time and time again that shirts are either not the right width along the shoulders or are very loose around the waist of many men.Unfortunately even if men are aware of this problem there is a general lack of fitted dress shirts in stores. To find the right mens fitted shirts there are a few options:1. If you have an athletic build there are shirts designed to enhance the look of your stature. Fits for this type of build are usually called athletic, slim, or modern fit. These fits come with a more narrow waist, chest, and hip area.2. Get a custom fit shirt. By getting a custom fit shirt you get a shirt that follows your specific dimensions. At some custom shops you only give your neck and shoulder measurements, however at fully customizable shirt shops all measurements are asked for or taken. Nine times out of ten the fit is better with the fully customizable shirt.3. You’re lucky. You have a body that fits perfectly into a standard sized dress shirt, but lets be realistic its is only a small percentage that are in this category. If you do, just pass any store and get your fitted dress shirt. Be careful though sizes change from store to store.Overview of FitsStandard Sizes: 6 out of 10* (fit rating)Cons:o Difficult to know which size is righto Often baggy around the waisto Sizing standards differPros:o Buy it right away in any storeAthletic, Modern, Slim Fit Dress Shirts: 7 out of 10* (fit rating)Cons:o Only suitable for slim or athletic bodieso Does not fit if one part of your body is slightly larger or longer than the normo May not give the optimal comfort if working in front of a computer a lotPros:o The best option for ‘ready to wear’ dress shirts if you have a slim bodyo Stylish fitHalf Bespoke Shirts: 7 out of 10* (fit rating)Cons:o Does not solve the problem of a baggy waist area. Not suitable for the slim man.o Does not always result in a correct shirt lengthPros:o Fits people with irregularly sized necks or long arms.o Better fit than the athletic fit for the non slim man.Custom Dress Shirt – tailored, made to measure, bespoke shirts: 9-10 out of 10* (fit rating)Cons:o The fit depends on how experienced the shirt maker iso Depends on the accuracy of taking measurementso Depends on the tailors taste of a well fitted dress shirtPros:o If you use a shirt maker that seems professional the fit of your dress shirt can turn out incredible.o These shirt makers often take more effort in delivering quality workmanshipo Every dimension of the shirt is made according to your body.o Other than taking body measurements one can take measurements from ones best fitted dress shirt. Resulting in a copy of the old fit.* Based on our experience with customersWinner: The Custom Fitted Dress Shirt Of these three types of fit we recommend getting a fully customizable dress shirt, also known as tailored, bespoke, or made to measure dress shirts. This kind of made to measure fit usually involves around 9 measurements of your upper body, but varies from tailor to tailor. If you are getting a tailor to measure you for your custom fit shirt, he will usually take care of it all and you don’t have to give it a thought.However, if you are measuring yourself for an online tailor, a written guide will tell you exactly how to do it. We have one of these on ShirtsMyWay.com. Do notice that how and where shirt maker’s measure can vary. Below you will find the basic 9 measuring parts.

Designing Your Organic Veggie Garden – An Introduction to the Classic Designs | Gardening

There are a number of different designs you can use when planning your organic vege garden – and choosing an appropriate design style for your home and personality will ensure your vege garden is an attractive feature within the garden as a whole, rather than a functional sideline.It’s also important to consider the plants you want to grow. There is little point growing a pile of vegetables you won’t eat (although providing a local homeless shelter or food bank with homegrown vegetables is a wonderful way to use up surplus produce – a fantastic project if you have kids, too, as you can get them involved in gardening and charitable giving all at the same time.) You may also want to consider vegetables that you love, but can be expensive to buy. Salad greens often fall into the category with greens such as baby spinach ridiculously expensive in the shops, but so easy to grow at home.Add in any considerations around companion planting and you will have a guideline to laying out your vege garden.While there are an infinite number of garden designs to choose from, a few of the more classic vegetable garden designs are outlined below. You can choose the design that best suits your needs and personality, and then adapt it as you choose.Potager: The word ‘potager’ is now widely used in English to describe a formal vegetable garden which combines flowers, herbs and vegetables in an attractive pattern, with a clear structure. Fruit trees, often espaliered, are also used in potagers, together with topiary trees such as bay. Box hedging can be used to edge and define the beds, and can often be used to split the beds into geometric patterns. Pathways are made from traditional elements such as old brick, lime chip or shell, and create an attractive walk between the beds. with attractive pathways made from brick, shell or lime chip in between. You can include arches covered in roses or vine fruit, or highly structural plants such as artichokes. Potagers are ideal designs for organic gardening as the combination of vegetables, herbs and flowers allows for a huge range of companion planting options.If you vegetable garden will be clearly seen rather than hidden away, a potager may be an ideal option for you. However before you begin, take some time to sketch out your design – to scale if possible. They key to a successful potager is in the geometric detail and this is not something that you can usually play by ear.The Traditional Kitchen Garden: The kitchen garden is usually walled – stone or brick being the traditional materials, however modern gardens can create the ‘walled’ effect using fences or hedging, to fit with the style of your home. The entry to the garden is usually through a gate or archway.Kitchen gardens have a very organized layout. Both paths and plantings are run in straight lines, and pathways are usually made from gravel, or rammed earth covered in straw. Plantings tend to run north to south, to allow even access to sunlight.Unlike potagers, kitchen gardens are primarily functional and don’t include ornamental elements such as flowers. Herbs, however, have a place and can be used as borders along your paths. Lavender, rosemary and bay all make attractive and fragrant hedges.Vegetable Patchwork: In a vegetable patchwork plants are planted in bold blocks of single plants. In this way you create high visual impact and can design your plantings according to height, color and texture to create an attractive, interesting tapestry.There are usually wider, main pathways through the garden with smaller, narrower paths leading off into the beds to allow easier access to the planting blocks. Again, paths tend to be made from beaten earth or gravel. A patchwork garden is a easy way to manage your crop rotations – you simply move all your plantings over one block each year.Cottage Gardens: Cottage gardens are beautiful, care-free gardens which are characterized by a seeming lack of structure. Flowers are interwoven with vegetables and herbs to create an abundant, lush garden which can give joy to the senses. However as with all gardens a cottage garden needs some planning to work well.Pathways are meandering and narrow, so there can be as much planting as possible. A casual garden chair can be placed in a small nook – you can even grow things over it – and it will look perfectly in place. Paths are covered in straw and you can leave you’re your garlic and shallots to dry in the sun, which will only add to the atmosphere. The overall feeling is of productivity, vibrancy and abundance. However, when gardening organically bear in mind that your plants need adequate airflow, which can be a problem in a cottage garden. Diseases and pests can also spread quickly due to the intensive planting. Therefore it’s worthwhile keeping a good eye on your garden for any telltale signs of disease or infestation.City, or Container Gardening. Finally, you can still enjoy the fruits of your labor even if you are not lucky enough to have your own plot of earth. There are a wide variety of plants and herbs which do very well in pots and containers – including small window boxes.When deciding what to grow in your courtyard, balcony or patio, the type of tubs you use can be a key to your design. If you are simply keen to grow as much as possible then you can purchase organic gro bags from your local garden centre which will work well for a couple of plantings, and allow you to grow intensively. Otherwise choose your containers and pots in keeping with a theme – old English or Mediterranean, for example – and you can then grow plants which embrace this theme.You can now buy a huge range of dwarf plants which are ideal for container gardening. Dwarf peas and beans are ideal, as are tomatoes, and they have been bred to crop heavily.Remember, however, that your plants need plenty of sunshine – 6 hours a day is ideal – shelter from the wind and sufficient water. Your container plants will dry out far more quickly so will have higher water requirements than plants in a traditional plot.By designing your garden in a style you find personally attractive you will enhance the aesthetic appeal of your garden and discover it is a place where you actually want to spend more of your time. And this, of course, is where you reap the benefits with wholesome, abundant crops you can enjoy with family and friends.